Evidence Library

Showing 4 of 4 results.
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Roads in the United States are rarely developed with consideration for users other than motorists. This can result in dangerous conditions for pedestrians, bicyclists and users of public transit. Complete Streets policies seek to create safer roads by designing them to balance the needs and priorities of all users. These users typically include motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists and transit users. Complete Streets are often implemented through state or local transportation policies, state laws and regulations, or city ordinances.

 
Jingzhen, Yang, PhD, MPH •
Kent State University
Marizen Ramirez, PhD, MPH •
University of Minnesota

This study examined the consistency and variation in written high school policies addressing youth traumatic brain injuries (more commonly known as concussions) in relation to the three most common components of youth sports traumatic brain injury laws.

 
Tony Kuo, MD, MSHS •
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

A team from the LA Department of Health analyzed 20 different documents broadly defined as “joint use agreements.” The findings are displayed in this report, which provides a snapshot of the relative strengths and weaknesses of all 20 agreements through analysis and case studies from neighborhoods in the Los Angeles area.

 
Carol Cannon, MA •
CDM Group
Sue Thomas, PhD •
HBSA Inc.

Zoning laws that mix residential units with commercial and public/civic destinations have the potential to increase walkability. This study finds that significant relationships exist between the range and precision with which the zoning ordinances have been written and the mixture of walking destinations that result within the areas.